Lawmakers eye committee action on carbon tariff bill

A bipartisan effort to pave the way for a carbon border adjustment is gaining momentum in Congress.

E&E News

Democrats and Republicans in both chambers of Congress are coalescing around a bill that would build the case for tariffs on carbon-intensive imports. But how far they’ll move the ball forward remains a big question.

The push for the legislation — which could pave the way for what is known as a carbon border adjustment mechanism — was on full display Thursday.

A bipartisan House duo of Reps. John Curtis (R-Utah) and Scott Peters (D-Calif.) said they planned to introduce a measure this fall.

That same day, two champions of the Senate version of the bill talked up its prospects at a forum hosted by the Climate Leadership Council.

Sens. Chris Coons (D-Del.) and Kevin Cramer (R-N.D.) said that their path to advance their proposal would likely run through the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee, which has jurisdiction over the measure.

“Having Shelley Moore Capito and Tom Carper hear from folks that this is a bill that you support, that you understand, that you think has value … helps,” Coons told participants at a forum sponsored by the Climate Leadership Council, referring to the Environment and Public Works Committee’s top Republican and Democratic chair, respectively.

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